Green ash tree (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) is the second most popular tree at UIC, comprising of almost 7% of all trees on campus (out of 5,400)

Green ash tree (Fraxinus
pennsylvanica) is the second most popular tree at UIC, comprising of almost 7% of all trees on campus (out of 5,400).

This winter, UIC will be removing several trees around campus. The majority of these trees are ash and the UIC Grounds department has logged their health status and location beginning in September 2015.  Since then, the health of these trees has deteriorated and they must be removed.

A half-inch metallic green pest is making our trees sick. This pest is known as the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennus) and its larvae feed on the inner bark of the tree, slowly killing it from the inside. Read more about this invasive species here

UIC currently removes any ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) showing signs of emerald ash borer infestation, as well as neighboring ash trees. The impact that the borer will likely have on the campus forest serves as evidence of the need for greater campus tree diversity to prevent such a large impact by an insect that affects only one genus of tree.

Carly Rizor, superintendent of the Grounds department at UIC, is committed to preserving and maintaining our campus forest. “UIC will continue to work with professional arborists to ensure our canopy remains diverse yet compatible for our urban environment.”  

UIC takes great pride in our tree inventory, as we are a Tree Campus USA university since 2011. Read more about UIC’s involvement in the Arbor Day Foundations’ Tree Campus USA program, as well as how to join our Tree Care Committee.